Medical

Collective healthcare spending by the Canadian Government and individual Canadians was projected to top $200 billion for the first time ever in 2011.

Healthcare is a growing concern for everyone, irrespective of age, circumstance, socioeconomic status or profession. But a healthcare challenge is of particular interest to families in transition.

A first step in managing and dealing with healthcare considerations is extending one’s frame of reference and base of knowledge. The following “Fast Facts” relate to common medical related illnesses, though the list is not exhaustive.

Medical Health

Alzheimer’s Disease (learn more…)

  • An estimated 500,000 Canadians have Alzheimer’s disease, of which approximately 50,000 are under the age of 60.
  • Put another way, 1 in 11 Canadians over the age of 65 have Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia, and more than 65,000 live in the GTA.
  • Within the next generation, the number of Canadians with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia is expected to more than double, ranging between 1 and 1.3 million people.
  • 17% of Canadians have someone with Alzheimer’s disease in their immediate family.

Autism Spectrum Disorder (learn more…)

  • Approximately 190,000 Canadian children have autism.
  • International studies indicate that approximately one in every 150-160 children has autism.
  • Signs of autism are usually present by age three and it is 4 times more prevalent in boys than in girls.

Cancer (learn more…)

  • 40% of Canadian women and 45% of men will develop cancer in their lifetime.
  • In 2011, approximately 177,800 new cases of cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancers) were diagnosed.
  • Over 50% and roughly 80,000 of these cases will be lung, colorectal, prostate and breast cancer.
  • An estimated 1 in 4 Canadians are expected to die from cancer. Approximately 75,000 deaths will occur in Canada each year due to cancer.
  • Lung cancer accounts for more than 27% of all cancer deaths each year.

Children

  •  An estimated 1,300 Canadian children and youth aged 0-19 develop cancer each year. Due to successful treatment the number of deaths is almost one-seventh the number of cases.

Breast Cancer

  • Breast Cancer is the most common cancer amongst Canadian women.
  •  Every year, an estimated 23,400 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 5,100 will die from it.
  • On average, 64 Canadian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer every day.
  • On average, 14 Canadian women will die of breast cancer every day.
Colorectal Cancer
  • In 2011, an estimated 22,200 Canadians were diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 8,900 died from it.
  • Overall, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in men and women combined.
  • Every year, an estimated 9,700 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 3,900 will die from it.
  • Every year, an estimated 12,500 men will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 5,000 will die from it.
  • On average, 61 Canadians will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer every day.
  • On average, 24 Canadians will die of colorectal cancer every day.
Lung Cancer
  • In 2011, an estimated 25,300 Canadians were diagnosed with lung cancer and 20,600 died from it. Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women.
  • Every year, an estimated 12,200 women will be diagnosed with lung cancer and 9,300 will die from it.
  • Every year, an estimated 13,200 men will be diagnosed with lung cancer and 11,300 will die from it.
  • On average, 69 Canadians will be diagnosed with lung cancer every day.
  • On average, 56 Canadians will die of lung cancer every day.
Prostate Cancer
  • Prostate cancer is the most common cancer amongst Canadian men.
  • Every year, an estimated 25,500 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 4,100 will die from it.
  • On average, 70 Canadian men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer every day.
  • On average, 11 Canadian men will die of prostate cancer every day.

Children and Obesity (learn more…)

  • Almost 60% of adults age 18 and over, and 14.1 million Canadians are overweight or obese.
  • 26% of Canadian children aged 2-17 are overweight or obese. This number increases with age.
  • Children who are obese are at an increased risk of remaining overweight or obese as adults.

Diabetes (learn more…)

  • More than 9 million Canadians are living with diabetes or pre-diabetes. More than 1.5 million are in the GTA.
  • In 2010, 15.3% of obese Canadians had diabetes compared to 5% of individuals who were not obese.
  • Diabetes can cause further health-related complications such as heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.
  • Type 2 diabetes was once a disease that occurred primarily in adults, however it is increasingly affecting children and adolescents.
  • In 2010, 6.4% of Canadians aged 12 or older reported that they had diabetes.
  •  One in every three American children born in 2000 will likely be diagnosed with diabetes in their lifetime. Similar rates are anticipated in Canada.
  • In the next 15 years, it is anticipated that type 2 diabetes will grow by up to 50% globally.

Heart and Stroke (learn more…)

  • 1 in 4 Canadians will contract some form of heart disease.
  • Heart disease costs the Canadian economy approximately $19 billion every year as a result of medical services, hospitalization expenses, loss of income and loss of productivity.
  • Obesity substantially increases one’s risk of heart and stroke related problems.

Heart Attack and Cardiac Arrest

  • 75,000 Canadians suffer heart attacks each year.
  •  Half of all heart attack victims are under 65 years old.
  • 16,000 Canadians die each year as a result of heart attacks.
  • Roughly 45,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in Canada.
  • For every 1 minute delay in defibrillation, the survival rate of a cardiac arrest victim decreases by 7-10%.

Stroke

  • Stroke is the third leading cause of death in Canada. 6% of all deaths in Canada are due to stroke.
  • 50,000 Canadians suffer a stroke each year.
  • 75% survive the initial event, however 60% of stroke victims who survive will be left with a disability – specifically a neurological disability.
  • Approximately 300,000 Canadians are currently living with the effects of stroke.

Statistics were taken from Autism Ontario, Alzheimer Society Canada, the Canadian Cancer Society, the Canadian Diabetes Association, Canadian Institute for Health Information, the Heart and Stroke Foundation and Stats Canada

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